Parables Logo

We publish realistic LDS novels for adult readers.

cover of Coming of Elijah cover of Path of Dreams cover of In a Dry Land cover of Bound on Earth

PRESS RELEASE

COPE WINS COVETED MARILYN BROWN NOVEL AWARD

Arianna Cope accepting the Marilyn Brown Novel Award.

Arianne Cope, former managing editor of the Tremonton Leader, has won the biennial Marilyn Brown Novel Award with The Coming of Elijah, a novel based on her family’s experience with the Indian Placement Program.

The judges called Cope’s work weightier, more ambitious, and more moving than the other entries—a feminine response to Brady Udall’s The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint and an achievement akin to Momaday’s House Made of Dawn.

“Though perhaps this novel might seem ungainly because of its ambition to chronicle nearly five decades in the lives of a Native American woman and her daughter,” the judges said, “none of the critics would want the writer to take on anything less than this large arc of history. Though the characters may often seem painfully mixed and complicated, this texture seems good for the story and its power. The work has real gravity. It is bracingly unsparing in its attention to the sheer awfulness and sense of deep cultural and spiritual betrayal and despair in the life of a Navajo-Anglo working-class family here in happy Utah Valley through the last five decades, dealing with the larger problems that the story of such a family reveals for a church that has aspired to enlighten the lives of people of all ethnicities.”

Cope was formerly on the New Era staff and has also written for the Friend and the Ensign. She, her husband, Jared, and their children, Samuel and Sophia, live in Logan, Utah. “White Shell,” an excerpt adapted from The Coming of Elijah, was published in the Winter 2005 issue of Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought.

The novel will be released in July by Parables (www.parablespub.com).

Arianna Cope with her parents.

Family with Navajo Student.

EAST COAST FIRM TO PUBLISH PRIZEWINNING LDS FICTION

Parables, a new LDS publishing house in Maryland is set to release two serious adult novels this summer that will certainly catch the attention of readers.

The first is The Coming of Elijah by Arianne Cope of Logan, recent winner of the Association of Mormon Letters (AML) Marilyn Brown Novel Award. The judge’s called Cope’s work weightier, more ambitious, and more moving than the other entries—a feminine response to Brady Udall’s The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint and an achievement akin to Momaday’s House Made of Dawn. “Though perhaps this novel might seem ungainly because of its ambition to chronicle nearly five decades in the lives of a Native American woman and her daughter,” the judges said, “none of the critics would want the writer to take on anything less than this large arc of history. Though the characters may often seem painfully mixed and complicated, this texture seems good for the story and its power. The work has real gravity. It is bracingly unsparing in its attention to the sheer awfulness and sense of deep cultural and spiritual betrayal. . .in the life of a Navajo-Anglo working-class family here in happy Utah Valley.”

The second title is The Path of Dreams by Eugene Woodbury of Orem. The manuscript was a finalist in the Utah Original Writing Contest, sponsored by the Utah Arts Council. Like Cope’s novel, Woodbury’s story is also multicultural—the quirky romance of two former missionaries to Japan, one the Japanese-American daughter of a mission president there, and the other the son of nineteenth-century Scotch immigrants. Haunted by disturbing dreams, before they’ve even met, the couple also confronts racial tensions, family objections, and class differences that would keep them apart.

Parables hopes to find three more novels to publish this year. “Maybe someday we’ll be able to attract an audience for LDS Miltons and Shakespeares, but for the time being, we’d be overjoyed to find an LDS Cather, O’Connor, Bellow or Potok, because those are the writers we and the people we know like to read,” the couple said.

On top of being published writers themselves, Elizabeth and George Bentley operated an independent bookstore in Massachusetts for nine years. They found a lack of challenging, faithful fiction available in the LDS market and want to fill the gap. Parables (www.parablespub.com) was originally launched in 1982 to publish the anthology LDSF-2: Latter-day Speculative Fiction, but this revival of the company will concentrate on full-length novels.